Visit to Molokai- Feb 5, 2010

 
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In February, 2010, Linda and I traveled to Molokai to spend 8 days laying on the beach. This trip was originally sheduled as an Elderhostel trip - it was cancelled because of a lack of participants, but we decided to go anyway.

Molokai, of course, is most famous for being the dumping ground for the island folks who had leprosy in the 1800s. I'm not sure if this is the reason that no tourist industry ever got started here, but, in fact, there is very little tourism and the island has escaped the curse of success. Molokai is approximately 75 miles long and averages about 10 miles in width. There are only 8,000 people on the entire island with most of them concentrated in two towns. Kaunakakai is on the south coast approximately halfway between the ends of the island. It resembles many small towns one sees in the lower 48. It didn't look very prosperous. Maunaloa is what is left of Dole Pineapple's company town - Dole left the island in 1975. We drove through this town - we couldn't see any commercial district to speak of and there were only a few dozen houses visible.

Throughout most of our stay, it felt like we had the entire island to ourselves - very few folks were out and about.

We could locate only two beaches of interest to us. The first is about 20 miles east of our hotel and is called, stangely enough, 20 mile beach by the locals. There is a small strip of sand only a few hundred yards long. It is supposed to be good snorkeling, but at this time of the year, the water is only a foot or so deep, and we didn't try it. The second beach is on the extreme western end of the island at the end of the road. It is called Dixie Maru beach and this is where we spent most of our time - it has a few hundred yards of nice beach and a little, sheltered lagoon area for swimming. I did a little snorkeling here, but didn't see much. One day we saw a turtle playing around just a few feet into the water.

One of the things we enjoyed most was watching the whales in the channel between Molokai and Lanai - there were hundreds of them and they were very active. Several times we saw whales leap completely out of the water. More times than one could count we saw them breaching the water. They are magnificent creatures that inspire the awe of everyone that sees them. It's hard to understand how anyone could be hunting them.

 

In February, 2010, Linda and I traveled to Molokai to spend 8 days laying on the beach. This trip was originally sheduled as an Elderhostel trip - it was cancelled because of a lack of participants, but we decided to go anyway.

Molokai, of course, is most famous for being the dumping ground for the island folks who had leprosy in the 1800s. I'm not sure if this is the reason that no tourist industry ever got started here, but, in fact, there is very little tourism and the island has escaped the curse of success. Molokai is approximately 75 miles long and averages about 10 miles in width. There are only 8,000 people on the entire island with most of them concentrated in two towns. Kaunakakai is on the south coast approximately halfway between the ends of the island. It resembles many small towns one sees in the lower 48. It didn't look very prosperous. Maunaloa is what is left of Dole Pineapple's company town - Dole left the island in 1975. We drove through this town - we couldn't see any commercial district to speak of and there were only a few dozen houses visible.

Throughout most of our stay, it felt like we had the entire island to ourselves - very few folks were out and about.

We could locate only two beaches of interest to us. The first is about 20 miles east of our hotel and is called, stangely enough, 20 mile beach by the locals. There is a small strip of sand only a few hundred yards long. It is supposed to be good snorkeling, but at this time of the year, the water is only a foot or so deep, and we didn't try it. The second beach is on the extreme western end of the island at the end of the road. It is called Dixie Maru beach and this is where we spent most of our time - it has a few hundred yards of nice beach and a little, sheltered lagoon area for swimming. I did a little snorkeling here, but didn't see much. One day we saw a turtle playing around just a few feet into the water.

One of the things we enjoyed most was watching the whales in the channel between Molokai and Lanai - there were hundreds of them and they were very active. Several times we saw whales leap completely out of the water. More times than one could count we saw them breaching the water. They are magnificent creatures that inspire the awe of everyone that sees them. It's hard to understand how anyone could be hunting them.